313 | Operationalizing Company Values with Dina Dwyer Owen

Company values are often taken for granted. We take time to develop values with our teams (I hope you include your team). We talk about them for a while. Then we let them fade away into the background. Our guest today is Dina Dwyer, the CEO of The Dwyer Group – a group of companies. These brands provide a diverse array of specialty services through more than 3,100 franchises in nine countries. Dina shares why values are so critical to growth. Discover more about values than the traditional conversation going on these days.

Don't miss an episode. Subscribe to Leaders in the Trenches.


Values within your company are often taken for granted. We take time to develop values with our teams (I hope you include your team). We talk about them for a while. Then we let them fade away into the background. Our guest today is Dina Dwyer, the CEO of The Dwyer Group – a group of companies. These brands provide a diverse array of specialty services through more than 3,100 franchises in nine countries. Dina shares why values are so critical to growth. Discover more about values than the traditional conversation going on these days.

Target Audience: Dina helps companies find harmony within their teams by helping them define and thus get clear on the expectation of behaviors.

Share the LOVE and TWEET about this episode.

Company Values

At the cornerstone of operationalizing company values, must be integrity, refined customer focus, and having fun. In taking one of those core areas, we ask: what do we mean by that? Why operationalize the values? Why is it important and how to you actually do it?

Operationalizing values gives people clarity about your expectations regarding their behavior. We like to follow the golden rule: treat everybody the way you want to be treated. Listen with intent to understand what is being said. Acknowledge that what is being said is important to the speaker.

What are the things that go wrong when you don’t have operational values?

Without operational values, there is bound to be confusion. For example, there may be inconsistencies in the way your team members treat a customer. It also causes confusion between employees.

Therefore, it is important to know that the people you are leading know what is expected of them.

Setting Expectations

How do we expect people to know what to do without setting the intended expectations? Setting clear expectations creates clarity. Dina says, you want to reinforce these expectations daily. You can achieve this by taking what’s most important in the business and creating systems around it so that those systems can be replicated. This type of culture creates trust and reliability.

Identifying expectations of behaviors is not to be taken lightly. In fact, Dina spent over a year identifying the behaviors she and her team wanted as a company. They asked themselves: What are looking for from ourselves and from our team members?

The Result of Setting Expectations

When expectations are clearly defined, people start taking personal responsibility. And it’s not often that you have to say to someone that they are “falling off” on something. Part of their performance review is about how they lived up to their values. This is used as a measurement in terms of how they evaluate people.

Practical and Actionable

Access the free workbook HERE. 

Based on wherever you are in the life cycle of creating your values, you can pick on whatever step you need to. There are 6 steps. Simple- yet challenging.

Resources:

A QUICK FAVOR

And lastly, please leave a rating and review for the Leaders in the Trenches on iTunes (or Stitcher) – it will help us in many ways, but it also inspires us to keep doing what we are doing here. Thank you in advance!

Other related interviews to this one are: